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Red Bull 2018 (RB 14)


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#46 alberto.ascari

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Posted 13 April 2018 - 16:09

Pisalo se o MSC da je njegova oscilacija noge u prolasku krivinama bila maestralna.
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#47 Rad-oh-yeah?

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Posted 13 April 2018 - 16:23

Mislim da nisu iste oscilacije u pitanju.


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#48 4_Webber

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Posted 13 April 2018 - 17:01

Mislim da nisu iste oscilacije u pitanju.


Da, Horner jednostavno ne sme da kaze da je Maks pogresio, jbg, pa se tako doslo do ovakve igre recima.
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#49 alberto.ascari

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Posted 13 April 2018 - 17:03

Mislim da nisu iste oscilacije u pitanju.

 

 

Naravno.

 

Probaću da nadjem text, sećam se da sam o tome čitao, koliko desetina (!!) pokreta noge na gasu ima u jednoj krivini. Navodno je to bila ta umetnost najbržeg i najkontinualnijeg prolazka kroz krivine.


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#50 alberto.ascari

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Posted 13 April 2018 - 17:10

Evo ga nešto o tome.

 

https://www.linkedin...nd-willem-toet/

 

 

Radoje, možeš i da prebaciš na tehniku vožnje, nije mu ovde mesto.


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#51 Rad-oh-yeah?

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Posted 13 April 2018 - 17:42

Radoje, možeš i da prebaciš na tehniku vožnje, nije mu ovde mesto.

 

Ne mere, arhivirato... :(


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#52 alberto.ascari

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Posted 13 April 2018 - 20:15

Ne mere, arhivirato... :(

 

 

e dagayebem, i ti si mi neki mod na baterije.... :lol+:  :lol+: 


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#53 4_Webber

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Posted 13 April 2018 - 21:30

Radoje je u formi danas, fino brani boje Meklarena na Autosportu.. Meni isisase dusu pesimisti, nemam vise snage


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#54 alberto.ascari

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Posted 13 April 2018 - 21:56

Radoje je u formi danas, fino brani boje Meklarena na Autosportu.. Meni isisase dusu pesimisti, nemam vise snage

 

 

:D


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#55 Rad-oh-yeah?

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Posted 13 April 2018 - 23:06

Pa nije tesko braniti kada neko tvrdi da su Meklarenovi rezultati ove sezone gori nego proslogodisnji. Sve sto treba reci je "pogledajte semafor", nije neka velika mudros'. ;)


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#56 Rad-oh-yeah?

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Posted 14 April 2018 - 19:04

Frustrated Verstappen uses radio messages to put pressure on Renault
2018 Chinese Grand Prix

14th April 2018, 9:48
Dieter Rencken / Keith Collantine

 

Max Verstappen says his radio messages criticising the performance of his Renault power unit are intended to put pressure on the manufacturer to improve.

The Red Bull driver complained about his engine several times on the radio on Saturday in Shanghai.

He admitted his frustration with the situation when asked by RaceFans about his comments after qualifying.

“I think it would be a bad thing if it wouldn’t frustrate me, right?” said Verstappen. “I’m here to win races and I think everybody who’s working on my car wants exactly the same thing.

“If I would say it quietly I think I would be racing in GTs because I wouldn’t bother too much.”

Verstappen admitted his remarks were intended “to put a bit of pressure on them.

“Not only in public because what I say I don’t meant to the public, it’s to the guys who are listening to my radio.”

RaceFans believes Red Bull are forbidden from publicly criticising Renault’s power unit under the terms of their contract with the manufacturer. Red Bull’s engines are branded by sponsor TAG-Heuer.

Verstappen said he is still suffering from degradation in his power unit’s top speed when run at high revs, something he complained about last year.

“The gap on the straights were a bit bigger than we expected before we came here,” he said. “But then also from our side just fine-tuning [is needed].

“The power modes were not great. Some of the issues as well I’ve had before, like [getting] close to the limiter, some problems while upshifting and stuff, it just doesn’t really work.”
 

Verstappen’s radio messages

Final practice:

Verstappen: On the exit I don’t know what the [censored by FOM]’s is going on there.

What’s going on Max?

Verstappen: All the time when I push to the limit I’m just losing speed. I don’t want to do another fast lap. I’m not sure it’s healthy. I said this already last year in Baku about same kind of things happening now.

 

Q3:

Verstappen: “Mate the engine again clipping in turn seven, [censored by FOM].


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#57 Rad-oh-yeah?

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Posted 16 April 2018 - 20:41

Horner sure Verstappen will learn from his mistakes
Monday, 16 April 2018
Chris Medland / Image by Dunbar/LAT

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Red Bull team principal Christian Horner says he has already spoken to Max Verstappen about his impatience when overtaking after an error-strewn end to the Chinese Grand Prix.

Verstappen had driven an impressive race to be running third and closing on leaders Valtteri Bottas and Sebastian Vettel when a Safety Car saw Red Bull pits both of its drivers for fresh tires, dropping Verstappen to fourth behind Lewis Hamilton. Having run wide attempting to pass the defending champion – handing a place to eventual race winner Daniel Ricciardo – Verstappen later hit Vettel at the hairpin and apologized to the championship leader for the incident.

"I was talking with him after the race," Horner said of Verstappen (pictured above with Horner, left). "He put his hand up, he's apologized to Sebastian. He did that immediately as they got out of the cars. I spoke with Sebastian and he appreciated Max had apologized to him.

"Yes he's made some mistakes but I remember when we had Sebastian at a similar stage of his career, it wasn't uncommon that he also made some mistakes. He will have learned an awful lot from [the race] and put that to good use in the coming races, because we have a very quick car as we've demonstrated.

"This result could have been repeated last weekend in Bahrain. Daniel would have been in a strong place in the position he was in."

On the mistake attacking Hamilton, Horner believes Verstappen put himself in a compromised position despite his fresh tires.

"Max had a grip advantage, he got a better drive, he found himself on the outside and decided to hang it out with Lewis, who was never going to concede in that corner easily. He was more generous with Daniel in the braking area but Daniel picked his time differently to where Max decided to have a go."

Asked if he needs to sit down with Verstappen to help the mistakes his driver has made sink in, Horner replied: "It will.

"I'm fully confident that he's a phenomenal talent and he's smart enough to recognize areas that he needs to work on and I have no doubt that he will address it. We've already discussed it."

Despite Verstappen being reflective after the race and admitting he may need to change his approach, Horner is confident the 20-year-old will not lose any of his impressive skill behind the wheel.

"I don't think so. You know, his talent is extremely obvious, his bravery and racing instinct is not in doubt. His judgment [in China], he was too impatient. He will have for sure learned from that. I have no doubt of that."


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#58 Rad-oh-yeah?

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Posted 16 April 2018 - 20:42

MEDLAND: Verstappen needs to learn from a Red Bull blueprint
Monday, 16 April 2018
Çhris Medland / Images by Tee, Etherington, Dunbar/LAT

1015108220-LAT-20180414-_2ST8703.jpg


There was joy and despair etched on Christian Horner's face at various times during the final 20 laps of the Chinese Grand Prix, and not for the first time, each emotion related to a specific driver.

As Daniel Ricciardo was scything his way from sixth to win, his pass on Lewis Hamilton had Horner punching the air with both fists as the Red Bull sailed down the inside of one of Formula 1's latest brakers from a long way back.

Minutes later, at the same Turn 14 hairpin, it was head-in-hands time as Max Verstappen clumsily ran into the side of Sebastian Vettel and pitched both himself and the former Red Bull protege into a spin that ended the team's hopes of a one-two result.

I've had a different vantage point during the past two grand prix weekends as I've been substituted into the pit lane reporter role for BBC Radio 5Live, allowing me access to those at the heart of the action when emotions are even more raw. For Verstappen, it was a night and day difference between what was literally the night of Bahrain and cold light of day in China.

His collision with Hamilton at Turn 1 early in the Bahrain Grand Prix was somewhat unnecessary in my view, but Hamilton had the opportunity to back out at that stage of the corner, too. He didn't have to, but with Verstappen being aggressive and having the move done, there was no right of reply, and the Mercedes driver had the ability to avoid the contact that the Dutchman was unnecessarily leading them towards.

So Verstappen felt empowered after that incident. There was reason to argue he was in the right, and as misjudgments go, it wasn't massive. In fact, it was very similar to what Fernando Alonso did to Vettel in the closing laps in China. If anything, Alonso was even more aggressive...

Fast-forward seven days, and there was no right of reply for Verstappen. He committed too late to the move on Vettel, and cost himself at least a podium finish. Had he not been over-ambitious attempting to pass Hamilton around the outside of Turn 7, he most probably would have won the race.

But I mention my positioning over the past two weeks because there was a very clear change in the 20-year-old. In Bahrain, it was a Verstappen I had seen before: full of self-belief and conviction that he was right to do what he did, even if it didn't come off. His confidence had not been shaken.

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Perhaps that's why he thought he could carry a huge amount more speed than Hamilton around the outside of a high-speed corner, and why he looked to rectify that mistake by wasting no time in trying to pass Vettel. But neither came off, and by the time Verstappen had walked from his car to the broadcast pen, he had already sought out the championship leader to apologize. In itself that gesture was a break from the norm.

It's always hard to know what's going on inside a driver's head, but as the Australian national anthem rang out for his teammate, Verstappen was beginning to show signs of self-doubt.

And with his having openly admitted his mistakes, I asked a question that might well have drawn an angry response.

"We quite often see you make some really aggressive moves and that often leads to some spectacular racing, but is there a point where you stop and think maybe you need to make a few changes if [mistakes] are happening too often?"

But there was no reaction on Verstappen's face. Simply a raise of the eyebrows, and an acceptance that perhaps his approach needs to be revisited.

"Well, I will analyze everything and I'll try to put that in my knowledge and try to have a better race in Baku," he said. "It's not something I'm happy with, but those moments happen in your career, I guess. I think everybody has been through those kinds of things. Nobody wants it, but unfortunately it happens.

"So, a difficult start to the year. I think in terms of speed, all good, but somehow, I don't know why in the races... maybe wanting it a bit too much and recovering from all the stuff that happened before, but it's a bit difficult to really judge that now."

There was still pragmatism in Verstappen's voice, but it was the first time I had seen his confidence shaken.

Forget the fact that he is 20. Verstappen is special, and has the race experience in F1 to expect better. But he is definitely in the right place to grow stronger. He has 63 starts to his name in Formula 1, and he shouldn't ignore the lessons that he can learn from some other Red Bull alumni very close to him.

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For comparison, Vettel had made just 60 starts for Red Bull by the time he won his first drivers' championship in 2010. Granted, that was a year in which he also made some high-profile errors - think colliding with Mark Webber in Turkey and Jenson Button in Spa - but he was at the point of ironing those out. In a dominant car, his 63rd start was second place in China early in a run of nine consecutive top-two finishes that made a second title a formality.

Verstappen doesn't have a dominant car, but neither does Ricciardo next to him, and the Australian provided the perfect blueprint for climbing through the field with a tire advantage. His move on Hamilton was definite - late enough that the Mercedes was already braking, but early enough to be seen - and he made it easy for himself against Vettel.

But the move against Bottas was something else. Squeezed to where there was less grip and barely a car's width, Ricciardo got himself fully alongside the Finn long before the turn-in point to claim the high ground, and found the perfect braking pressure to keep it clean. How does he do it?

Well, something the instinctive Verstappen should note is, Ricciardo often has it all planned out long in advance. He'd decided he was making the move on Bottas exiting the opening two corners, and committed. That decisiveness paid off.

He's also keeping margins during the rest of the race, working out where his latest possible braking point would be in such a move while not risking an error by being so on the edge lap-after-lap.

In analyzing Ricciardo, Verstappen won't lose the ability to pull off the thrilling moves fans love to see, but he will learn how to further lower the chances of such a move going wrong. And in looking at Vettel, he will understand how raw talent evolved into a driver capable of winning four championships on the bounce.

And the signs are that he's already learning. With Hamilton having sought him out during an autograph signing session on Thursday to move on from Bahrain, it was Verstappen's turn to make the move when he approached Vettel after the checkered flag to admit his mistake.

The humility and self-reflection on display after the race should not be seen as weakness. These recent mistakes might all prove to be the catalyst for Verstappen to go to the next level.


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#59 Rad-oh-yeah?

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Posted 17 April 2018 - 14:57

Daniel Ricciardo should resist Ferrari and Mercedes to stay at Red Bull, insists Christian Horner
Ricciardo best placed at Red Bull for title shot, says Horner; Join the debate as Brundle and Rosberg have their say on Australian's future
By Matt Morlidge
Last Updated: 17/04/18 12:11pm
 
skysports-daniel-ricciardo_4285034.jpg

 
Christian Horner insists Daniel Ricciardo can fulfil his title-challenging ambitions at Red Bull and has urged the in-demand driver to resist potential advances from Mercedes and Ferrari.

Ricciardo put on another overtaking masterclass as he won a stunning Chinese GP on Sunday and, out of contract at the end of the season, has been linked with Red Bull's two main rivals.
 
Mercedes and Ferrari are both likely to be monitoring the 2019 driver market and the Australian, while keeping his options open, is desperate to fight for a first F1 world championship and admitted the Shanghai win "wouldn't hurt" his position at the negotiating table.

Horner, however, felt Ricciardo and the team's performance was proof that he is in the right place.

skysports-daniel-ricciardo_4285102.jpg

"If we can give him a car like we did today, why would he want to be anywhere else?" said the Red Bull team principal.

Horner also pointed to the fact Ferrari appeared to favour Sebastian Vettel when it came to race strategy last weekend, with Kimi Raikkonen kept out of the pits in a bid to help his team-mate's battle for the lead.

"If you look at Kimi's race, I didn't understand that strategy," added Horner. "I think Daniel's happy in the environment."

Ricciardo was hailed as F1's "master conjurer" after his sensational China comeback, storming from sixth to the lead in less than 10 laps with memorable overtakes on Raikkonen, Lewis Hamilton and Valtteri Bottas, who are also all out contract in 2018.

His perfectly-timed charge was in stark contrast to team-mate Max Verstappen's end to the race, as the Dutchman was penalised and criticised for his shunt into Vettel.

And Horner believes the 28-year-old is now at the peak of his powers.

"He's a very rounded driver now," the Red Bull boss insisted. "He's absolutely at the top of his game and I think he has been for the last couple of years.

"He's hit that balance of experience and pace. He's one of the best overtakers in the business and his judgement is impeccable in terms of judging a gap, getting the car stopped and getting it rotated.

"I feel he's in a different part of his career to where Max is at the moment, who is still very young and fresh and going through that experience."

What next for Ricciardo?

Martin Brundle: "It's a tough call for Ricciardo, assuming the two seats are actually available to him. Might Red Bull eventually be a more comfortable and faster home to remain at than Mercedes or Ferrari, or have they invested their future primarily into Verstappen?

"If Mercedes is an opportunity, where would he sit within the all-powerful sphere of Lewis Hamilton?

"Let me throw this outrageous curveball. Hamilton doesn't seem particularly happy at the moment, and I can imagine he will be super expensive to hire for his next Merc contract too. If that isn't already signed, would Mercedes go for the four-and-a-half-year younger Ricciardo instead?"

skysports-daniel-ricciardo_4284527.jpg

Nico Rosberg: "Where would I drive if I was Daniel Ricciardo?

"I would go to Ferrari because he knows he can beat Vettel, and they have the best car at the moment."


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#60 Rad-oh-yeah?

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Posted 18 April 2018 - 12:31

Ricciardo credits conviction for overtaking success
Tuesday, 17 April 2018
By Chris Medland / Image by Etherington/LAT

ricciardo_Etherington.jpg


Daniel Ricciardo believes the secret to most of his overtaking success is the conviction with which he approaches a pass.

Teammate Max Verstappen has been involved in incidents in each of the past two races, with his clumsy attempt to overtake Sebastian Vettel in Sunday's Chinese Grand Prix earning him a ten-second time penalty and ruining his hopes of a podium. Ricciardo, by contrast, made a number of clean moves to rise from sixth on track to win, and when pushed on how he manages to pull them off without incident the Australian replied: "Conviction."

"I think I plan it very much in advance. With Valtteri [Bottas], going through Turn 3 – the left – even at the apex before we got the exit I was like, 'I'm going this lap' and that was it. So I'd already given myself five or seven seconds to prepare it if you know what I mean. So I was just ready and had conviction."

The move on Bottas was for the lead and saw both drivers go wheel-to-wheel, but Ricciardo also managed to outbrake Lewis Hamilton from a long way back at the Turn 14 hairpin, and when asked if he was braking at the same points each lap he responded: "Definitely not!"

"I was a bit later. But I always keep a bit of margin for times like those. I knew even if I ran a bit deep either I would get another chance or my traction would still be good enough to maybe hang on. So I wanted to try. But I wasn't just sending a Hail Mary, I really thought I could do it, so that was a lot of fun."

Red Bull has been confident in the pace of its car since the opening race of the season and Ricciardo's win leaves him 17 points adrift of championship leader Vettel. While not willing to say he's a title contender yet, Ricciardo says his overtaking approach won't change if he is in contention later in the season.

"Always after a win you feel like it but it's still very early, still very early. But I think I proved that if I was [in a title fight] I would send it and I would make the most of the opportunity."


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