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#31 chandra

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Posted 13 December 2003 - 14:16

2 Voo:

Posla nikad dosta... :lol: :lol: :lol:

2 Brisko, Voo, Bebel, Pal:

Izbor na berzi se zaista suzio. I slazem se da je kvalitet samih izdanja jako opao, a meni znaci da imam lepo uradjen omot i da cd moze da se slusa.

Mozda cu sutra tamo i otici, treba neki klinac da mi donese 10-ak komada, ali sve mi vise prija da kupovinu zavrsim sa samim "proizvodjacem" na nekom prijatnijem (i toplijem i za njega bezbednijem) mestu.

Dakle, ako poziv za razmenu i dalje stoji javite se...

BTW, jazz bi umro u beogradu da nema pirata. pogledajte samo izbor i cene legalnih izdanja! pre nekoliko nedelja dobio sam neku lovu i usao u ips sa namerom da kupim neki original. sve sam pregledao i nisam nasao NISTA sto bi me zanimalo. a pri tom cene blue note reizdanaj koje se napolju krecu oko 8 evra, ovde su 1100 dinzi i vise... skotovi...
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#32 Voo

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Posted 13 December 2003 - 15:56

HE WAS PARTICULAR ABOUT HIS EGGS
John Coltrane and his cousin, Mary Alexander, lived together first as children in North Carolina and later as teenagers in Philadelphia for the better part of two decades. Mary and their two mothers, who were sisters, were John Coltrane's immediate family. It was fascinating listening to her remember him, not as an icon, but as a little boy who liked to draw pictures, a member of the junior high football team and to me most of all as someone who was "Particular about his eggs."
-- Joel Dorn
Joel Dorn: Tell me about the early years in North Carolina--your earliest memories of John.
Mary Alexander: He was born in Hamlet on Sept. 23, 1926, and 10 months later to the day, July 23, 1927, I came along. I was born in High Point. John's mother and my mother were sisters. There were only four grandchildren in all. John and I had two female cousins who were old enough to be our parents. We were the babies of the family. Our grandfather was a minister, the Reverend W.W. Blair. He had an honorary doctor of divinity degree. So he was called Doctor. He was instrumental in opening the first black elementary school in High Point. He was very influential in this town. I always felt John was like grandpa.
JD: Was he quiet like John was?
MA: No, not really. Maybe he reminded me of grandpa in a spiritual way.
JD: What kind of shape was the family in financially?
MA: High Point is a very strange place. The affluent and poor people lived right next door to each other. That's the way it was there. One of my teachers lived across the street, so did the dentist. Our next-door neighbor was a doctor; another teacher and the family of another minister also lived on the street. We lived like they lived, but we were poor.
JD: What kind of child was John?
MA: Well, John was basically a good child, but he was mischievous and he always had this dry sense of humor. Basically he was very quiet.
JD: Was there anything about him as a young child that indicated he had an inclination toward music? Or that he was at all artistic?
MA: Well, John could always draw. He had a friend named Brower who liked to write so they used to put books together. John was the illustrator and Brower did the writing.
JD: Did the family think that he was going to be an artist at that point?
MA: No, nobody thought anybody was going to be anything.
JD: Were you encouraged to express yourselves?
MA: Yes. No one said be this or be that. Whatever we wanted to do, they went along with.
JD: Was it a musical household?
MA: Well, John's mom played the piano, not professionally or anything. And my mother sang. John's father played instruments, but he did it to entertain himself within his own bedroom. I didn't think Uncle John brought his violin or his ukulele outside of that bedroom. And we had a big radio in the living room that stayed on all the time. We listened to everything.
JD: Was there any live music in High Point?
MA: They had stage shows, but we had to sit up in the balcony. And there was a park where they had a dance floor. We used to go see Jimmie Lunceford, you know, big bands.
JD: What made everyone leave North Carolina?
MA: There were a lot of deaths. My father and John's father died, and in 1943 I left High Point to live in Newark, New Jersey. John stayed in High Point to graduate from high school. He was 17 and I was 16.
JD: Were you still in touch?
MA: Oh, definitely. We used to write postcards. In fact I kept one of John's postcards for the longest time: "I sure wish y'all would come home. I miss you."
JD: At this stage of the game, was John into music?
MA: Oh, yes.
JD: When did he first start playing?
MA: When he joined the Boy Scout band in our church. Reverend Steele was the head of it. And John had a music teacher in high school named Mrs. Yokely. But after our fathers passed, things changed. Our mothers had to go to work, and my aunt and my mother worked together at a country club. John used to shine shoes there. Our whole thing changed. No one really knew how we lived but we had to rent out our bedrooms and we all slept downstairs. My mother, John, and I all slept in the dining room. John's mother slept upstairs in the bedroom because she had arthritis and needed special attention.
JD: Did you eventually all end up in Philadelphia?
MA: Yes. After high school, John joined his mother, who was in Philly, and my mother and I moved to Philly from Newark. So we were all together again.
JD: Was John involved in music when you got to Philly?
MA: Oh, definitely, yes. He had started to play alto before he had left High Point. Even as a child he would sit at the table and practice all the time. He practiced all the time.
JD: He had discipline that early in the game?
MA: Yes, he would just sit in the dining room and practice.
JD: What kind of music did he like back then?
MA: Oh, he liked the big bands. That's what he first heard, the big bands. And then after a while you couldn't tell him that he wasn't Johnny Hodges.
JD: Was Hodges his first hero?
MA: Yes.
JD: Did John like popular music of the day?
MA: We listened to everything on the radio. We listened to Frank Sinatra, everybody, you name it. He and I would turn the radio up loud so that we could hear it in the kitchen.
JD: When did he first work professionally?
MA: In Philly. He worked with Jimmy Heath. He started working all the clubs on Columbia Avenue. The clubs ran from 9th Street up to 23rd. He played everything -- jazz, blues, whatever.
JD: Did he have any jobs other than being a musician?
MA: He didn't want any other jobs. The only reason he got a job was to stay out of the service. And he was interested in clothes at this time. He had real good taste in clothes. Any money he got he would take and buy clothes.
JD: Who were some of his musical friends in Philly?
MA: Jimmy Heath, Johnny Coles, Cal Massey, Bill Barron, and Bill Carney. All the Philly guys. And Specs Wright.
JD: Was Dizzy still in Philly at that time?
MA: No, Dizzy was gone.
JD: Let's get back to the service. When did John go into the Navy?
MA: He got drafted. He was only in for a year and he got to play with the Navy band. He was stationed in Hawaii and we used to worry about him.
JD: I remember reading one time that John liked to play football.
MA: He did, but he got hurt.
JD: Was he a good athlete?
MA: No, but he liked to play. You see, all the uniforms were hand-me-downs from the white schools. So were our schoolbooks. John didn't like that at all. Every time he opened a book that was from the white school it just got to him. It bothered him about the uniforms. But the thing about the books bothered him the most.
JD: What was the first name band that Trane worked with?
MA: I don't remember the order but he worked with Bull Moose Jackson and Eddie "Cleanhead" Vinson.
JD: Was there any point at which the family knew that John Coltrane was on his way to someplace special? MA: After it happened. We never looked at John as a genius, he was John. We all just lived in those two rooms and he would just sit there all the time and practice and smoke cigarettes. He would sit at my vanity and look at himself in the mirror playing his horn. We were used to his practicing but the neighbors weren't. When they complained, the minister of the church we attended gave John a key to the church. He could go there anytime he wanted and practice.
JD: Did his personality stay constant through the years? MA: He was the sweetest guy in the world. And even with all the things that he went through, he was still the sweetest guy in the world. When there were distractions, he still took care of business.
JD: Distractions like what -- drugs? MA: Yes, and that's when I knew he was going into something really big. Most people, when you're talking about something like drug addiction, would say "Well, this is going to hold him back" or "This is going to be no good." But I looked at him then and I knew he was going someplace. JD: Did the whole family know he was involved in drugs?
MA: Well, his first wife and my mother and I knew. But his mother didn't know until much later.
JD: Were you surprised that "the sweetest guy in the world" got involved with drugs and alcohol?
MA: Not really, it was the environment. All those guys were under a lot of pressure. It was a rough life. But they all had talent -- drugs were just part of that scene. I get disgusted with drug addicts now. They don't have talent, they're just into drugs.
JD: Did he talk much about being on the road? What road life was like? Who he hung out with?
MA: No he didn't. He'd say some things sometimes. Like, he didn't like New Orleans. He didn't like to go down there and play because he didn't like the segregation. He didn't like playing for a segregated audience. Other people would say they went to New Orleans and had a ball. John just sat in his hotel room, went to the gig, and then went right back to his room. Later they wanted him to go back and play in High Point, and he just wouldn't go back.
JD: Still upset from when he was a kid?
MA: He just wouldn't go. People down there would always ask me to get John to come down. But he wouldn't go.
JD: Was he interested in anything else besides music?
MA: Yes, eating. He loved to eat.
JD: Did he watch television?
MA: Yeah, he'd watch TV sometimes. But I remember one time that show came on about the talking horse, Mr. Ed. John looked at the TV and said, "Well, I'm not into talking horses today."
JD: Was he a cook?
MA: No. He learned to cook things he wanted, like oatmeal. Or he'd make a big thing of hot chocolate. He was real particular about his eggs. He didn't like any crust on the white part. My mother and aunt would always say, "If that's the way you want them, then you cook 'em."
JD: Let's talk about the song "Cousin Mary." How did you feel when he wrote that song?
MA: I knew how close we were, but I never thought he'd write a tune for me. I was living in New York then, and I came home from work one day and went over to visit John and Naima. And when she opened the door she said, "Mary, guess what? John wrote a tune for you." I said "WHAT?" That was the first time I found out about it. It wasn't called "Cousin Mary" at first. It was some kind of blues or somethin'. But then he renamed it for me.
JD: Are you satisfied with the way John is remembered?
MA: Well, they never appreciate you until you're gone.
JD: But he was really appreciated in his lifetime.
MA: He was, but more so after he died. But I feel people have really shown respect for him. And I feel very good about it.
Mary L. Alexander is the founder and guiding light of the John W. Coltrane Cultural Society, an organization dedicated to preserving the music, legacy, and spirit of John Coltrane.
Kimberly Berry, the program director of WRTI-FM in Philadelphia, arranged a meeting between Lewis Porter, Joel Dorn and Ms. Alexander at the station on March 1, 1995. The two-hour conversation, from which the preceding is excerpted, was recorded by Jennifer Hunter.


divan intervju :lol:
odgovor cousin Mary ja jedan redak primer odnosa prema ljudima koji su počeli da konzumiraju horsa.
ali, redak je jer nije svako trane.
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#33 pal

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Posted 13 December 2003 - 18:19

"Cousin Mary"

:lol: :lol: :lol:
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#34 bebel

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Posted 14 December 2003 - 17:17

[QUOTE]
naravno da stoji ali u mojem slucaju vi bi bili moji muzicki gurui,pa ako ima neko zivaca da se bakce sa neupucenima...a za ips ljudi ne idite tamo,to je provincijska atrakcija..uuuu original cist ripp off :angry: :angry: :angry:
zamisli pomenutog A.C.Jobim 5400 din..pa to su budalastine.. :angry: :angry: :angry:
ja mislim da je piraterija ambrozija i nektar za ovu kulturnu susu koja traje,traje..
[QUOTE]
nikad cula za nju ali cenim Eli regina,Anna Caram ..oni su vise sirova bossan
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#35 bebel

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Posted 14 December 2003 - 17:22

[quote name='bebel' date='14 Dec 2003, 17:17'] [QUOTE]
naravno da stoji ali u mojem slucaju vi bi bili moji muzicki gurui,pa ako ima neko zivaca da se bakce sa neupucenima...a za ips ljudi ne idite tamo,to je provincijska atrakcija..uuuu original cist ripp off :lol: :lol: :lol:
zamisli pomenutog A.C.Jobim 5400 din..pa to su budalastine.. :lol: :lol: :lol:
ja mislim da je piraterija ambrozija i nektar za ovu kulturnu susu koja traje,traje..
[QUOTE]
nikad cula za nju ali cenim Eli regina,Anna Caram ..oni su vise sirova bossan [/quote]
[QUOTE]
prethodni potpuna konfuzija..bebel jako umorna..gajton je poceo da mi ide na ocni zivac :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
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#36 brisko

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Posted 15 December 2003 - 03:28

Hello, jazz-erko i jazz-eri!!!
Bio sam danas na Berzi, pa evo da vam prenesem utiske i nahvalim se sa novitetima….Konačno sam došao do albuma Sama Layuca pijaniste McCoy Tynera i mogu da kažem da je Chandra bio skroz u pravu kada je u nekoj od prethodnih poruka hvalio ovu ploču!!!Sjajno u svakom pogledu!!!U pitanju je 5 stvari,na 4 svira band od devet ljudi, na jednoj samo Tyner i vibrafonista Bobby Hutcherson.Dosta udaraljki + zanimljiv doprinos flaute i oboe.Dinamična ploča, baš drži pažnju sve vreme!!!Ovo je McCoy Tyner u svom stilu, u punoj snazi, sigurno jedan od jačih njegovih diskova-(čuo ranije 10-ak pa sad kao nešto ocenjujem u odnosu na te prethodne).Druga planirana kupovina je bio Sonny Clark-ov Leapin` and Lopin`, još jedan majstor klavira, pravi Blue Note-ov hard-bop zvuk, fine i melodične glavne teme u svim stvarima.Ovo je valjda poslednji album(1961.) potpisan Clark-ovim imenom, piše na omotu pozadi da je on umro već 1963-e u 31. godini života, očigledno vodio uredan život kao i svi tadašnji jazz-eri!?To su moji noviteti, doduše video sam još dva Clark-va albuma- Standards i Dial S For Sonny za koje se priča da su zanimljivi(ne spadaju u vrh njegove karijere kao Sonny`s Crib i pomenuti Leapin` and Lopin`),ali to ću verovatno pazariti neki drugi put, mnogo je tri Clark-a odjednom ma koliko god da ste njegov fan!?Bežim čeka me pisanje diplomskog rada, da naškrabam još nešto dok me drži koncentracija......
P.S. Hej, da, jel` bio neko od vas na Berzi?Jeste li našli nešto zanimljivo?
P.S. 2 I što se tiče IPS-a, uvek su mi bili antipatični!! :lol: :lol: :lol: Šta bre košta 5400 dinara, jel` to neki BOX-set???I Berza je zakon za IPS!!!Ako imaš i neke druge izvore za diskove, još bolje!!!Jedan diler od koga su IPS svojevremeno kupovali piratske diskove je pričao da im je on prodavao za 75 dinara diskove koji su kod njih imali cenu 150 dinara(to se već sećate, nije bilo tako davno), “skromni ljudi” množili su nabavnu cenu samo sa 2, “mala im valjda zarada”Ko zna, zamislite da tako danas rade i sa orginalima??Kod IPS-a je sve moguće!!!
Ćao!!!
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#37 bebel

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Posted 15 December 2003 - 12:13

Hello, jazz-erko i jazz-eri!!!
Bio sam danas na Berzi, pa evo da vam prenesem utiske i nahvalim se sa novitetima….Konačno sam došao do albuma Sama Layuca pijaniste McCoy Tynera i mogu da kažem da je Chandra bio skroz u pravu kada je u nekoj od prethodnih poruka hvalio ovu ploču!!!Sjajno u svakom pogledu!!!U pitanju je 5 stvari,na 4 svira band od devet ljudi, na jednoj samo Tyner i vibrafonista Bobby Hutcherson.Dosta udaraljki + zanimljiv doprinos flaute i oboe.Dinamična ploča, baš drži pažnju sve vreme!!!Ovo je McCoy Tyner u svom stilu, u punoj snazi, sigurno jedan od jačih njegovih diskova-(čuo ranije 10-ak pa sad kao nešto ocenjujem u odnosu na te prethodne).Druga planirana kupovina je bio Sonny Clark-ov Leapin` and Lopin`, još jedan majstor klavira, pravi Blue Note-ov hard-bop zvuk, fine i melodične glavne teme u svim stvarima.Ovo je valjda poslednji album(1961.) potpisan Clark-ovim imenom, piše na omotu pozadi da je on umro već 1963-e u 31. godini života, očigledno vodio uredan život kao i svi tadašnji jazz-eri!?To su moji noviteti, doduše video sam još dva Clark-va albuma- Standards i Dial S For Sonny za koje se priča da su zanimljivi(ne spadaju u vrh njegove karijere kao Sonny`s Crib i pomenuti Leapin` and Lopin`),ali to ću verovatno pazariti neki drugi put, mnogo je tri Clark-a odjednom ma koliko god da ste njegov fan!?Bežim čeka me pisanje diplomskog rada, da naškrabam još nešto dok me drži koncentracija......
P.S. Hej, da, jel` bio neko od vas na Berzi?Jeste li našli nešto zanimljivo?
P.S. 2  I što se tiče IPS-a, uvek su mi bili antipatični!! :lol:  :lol:  :lol: Šta bre košta 5400 dinara, jel` to neki BOX-set???I Berza je zakon za IPS!!!Ako imaš i neke druge izvore za diskove, još bolje!!!Jedan diler od koga su IPS svojevremeno kupovali piratske diskove je pričao da im je on prodavao za 75 dinara diskove koji su kod njih imali cenu 150 dinara(to se već sećate, nije bilo tako davno),  “skromni ljudi” množili su nabavnu cenu samo sa 2, “mala im valjda zarada”Ko zna, zamislite da tako danas rade i sa orginalima??Kod IPS-a je sve moguće!!!
Ćao!!!

[/QUOTE
ali najzalosniji su ljudi koji potpuno fascinirani kupuju tamo..e to ti je najzalosnije u srbiji danas jer nam je beda postala toliko hronicno stanje da bukvalno svi otpatci sa zapada postaju kod nas senzacije..da li je neko izcekirao npr.Extra fensi prodavnicu na uglu s.Markovica i Tirsove-cista prevara..ne cudi me ako slicne kompenzacije idu i kod IPS.. :lol: :lol: :lol:
Nego sta je sa klubovima..gde slusate jazz ovako izvan 4 zida,slika i ploca..unutrasnji emigranti..
Verovatno niko od vas nije ni cuo za PASSAGE JAZZ FESTIVAL u Pancevu,i ne cudi jer je to (moj)
grad za koji se cuje jedino u kontextu prevrtanja neke VCM cisterne,hemijske havarije,povecanje incidence maligniteta..itd
taj fest. je bio moj poslednji dobar jazz-out Karlheinz Miklin trio,lik je bio dekan u Grazu,i svira recimo 6 vrsta nekih saxsofona..i upste nema harmonijske instrumente a tako zvuci,to je iz razloga sto se petljao sa elektronikom,onda Brad Lilli-New York bio u Count Basie orkestra..sve to je uticalo da je narednih 5 dana imam (pomalo patoloski) osmeh na licu.. :lol: :lol: :lol:
nego sta je to sa Private messages,jel to funkcinise?
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#38 chandra

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Posted 15 December 2003 - 16:36

2 Brisko:

Hvala, hvala... :lol: :lol:

To su u svakom slucaju najbolje Tynerove godine. A Sonny Clarka nemoj da kupujes, imam oba albuma koja pominjes... I jos jedan, NAJBOLJI, Cool Strutin'... Uvek su me fascinirali ti tipovi koji su dali ogroman doprinos jazzu, a nekako su ostali u drugom planu pored najizvikanijih imena. Ranije sam ovde napisao duzi tekst o Wayne Shorteru, ali slicno je i sa Clarkom i sa Lee Morganom, sa Andrew Hillom...

Sa IPSom je slicna prica kao i sa Platoom. Najgori pirati etablirali su se kao ljuti zastitnici autorskih prava i legalisti. :lol: :lol: :lol:

2 Bebel:

Nisam cuo za PASSAGE JAZZ FESTIVAL. U Beogradu slusam jazz ili kod kuce ili na discmanu... :lol: Ma nekada je bilo par lepih mesta, Sir John na Vracaru, u Ipanemi je muzika znala da bude bas ok, cak i u odvratnoj Havani. U Gracanickoj postoji Art & Blues caffe - ponekad dobre svirke. Pricaju mi o Rifu, takodje na Vracaru, u Paytonu. U Plato ne zalazim iz principa. U Radionici kad im dodje pustaju odlicnu muziku, pa zaluta i neki jazz, uglavnom Baker ili Miles. Ali pravi jazz club nedostaje ovom gradu. Definitivno. I to ne jazz club kao elitno mesto, vec kao prostor u kojem bi se pustala i svirala dobra muzika, a cuga bi bila dovoljno jeftina da mogu da dolaze i "radnici & studenti".
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#39 brisko

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Posted 16 December 2003 - 04:43

Chandra, super je što si se setio Clark-ovog Cool Struttin`, apsolutno fenomenalna ploča, uživanje, uživanje u svakom pogledu!!!!Cool Struttin` je i neverovatno snažna pozitivna asocijacija za ljude koji su dali ogroman doprinos jazz-u u svakom pogledu,a kao što ti kažeš ostali su u drugom planu pored najizvikanijih imena.Samo pogledaš koliko su u Miles-ovom bandu značili i Paul Chambers i P.J.Jones,a onda vidiš da su njih dvojica u svojim solo diskografijama ostavili jako malo albuma(Chambers-ve tri ploče sam slušao i sve tri su jako dobre*****1st Bassman, Bass on Top i Whims of Chambers*****, znam da ima još nekoliko kvalitetnih, tražio sam na preporuku jednog poznanika Chambers-ov dupli cd “GO” ali ga nisam pronašao).Jones-ove solo albume nisam slušao, ali sam siguran da su dobri znajući gde je sve čovek bubnjao.Simpatičan je i Jackie McLean, slušao sam od njegove solo karijere samo Capuchin Swing, i prijao mi je.I tu verovatno treba još malo čačkati po diskografiji, jer je relativno redovno snimao i jedini je još uvek živ od ekipe sa Cool Struttin`.Moram priznati da Farmera nisam dovoljno pratio!I ostali muzičari koje pominješ su fascinantni u svakom pogledu!!Lee Morgan legenda, car!!!!!Andrew Hill me relativno skoro baš obradovao, konzumirao njegov Black Fire!!!Shorter, koliko je on samo komponovao, pa šta je sve lepo snimio(jedino mi nije legao The All Seeind Eye, ne znam što???)Pa dobro, ovde ću i ja staviti nekoliko tačkica...................baš bi smo ove asove mogli da nabrajamo do sutra!!!
Kad već pominješ Plato, samo se nerviram kako njihovi konobari, mrtvi `ladni ne vraćaju kusur!!Tamo stvarno bolje ne odlaziti, sem ako baš hoćeš da poblesaviš???
Bebel, pa daj nisu samo hemijski akcidenti asocijacija na Pančevo!!!A Radio Pančevo iz vremena pre 5.10???Tada sam ga baš dosta slušao, Pera Janjatović je bio glavni muzički urednik, bilo je solidnih muzičkih emisija!!!......mada, Pera je posle pobegao nazad u Radio Beograd, a ja prestao da pratim program Radio P ni sam ne znam razlog......A kafić ili klub, šta je već, Kupe......I tamo je radila neka uporna ekipa što se tiče organizacije koncerata???Pa bre kakvu samo postavu, imate vi Pančevci na Berzi???Važan, dobar i pouzdan izvor pristojne nove muzike!!!!Pa kod vas je svirao i Duško Gojković!!!
Brad Lilly-ja sam slušao u Beogradu na Kolarcu sa Big Band-om RTS-a i bio je to baš dobar koncert, solidno popunjena sala, raspoložena publika......Poslednji koncerti koje sam posetio, a mirišu na jazz, barem što se tiče muzičke prošlosti bandleader-a su Joe Zawinul u Sava Centru(relativno skoro, na onom festivalu) to je bila demonstarcija perfektno usviranog band-a, digli su narod iz foltelja, kao sve super......ali ipak mi je samo mirisalo na jazz......Bio sam i u Domu omladine na Erik Truffaz-ovom nastupu i bilo mi je OK!!To je valjda neki moderni jazz, šta znam???Truffaz je rekao pre koncerta da ga Be-Bop više ne zanima, da kad mu se sluša Be-Bop uzme Miles-ov Milestones i sluša Be-Bop.Ma kako može jedan muzičar koji izdaje za ovaj današnji Blue Note(u kandžama multinacionalki) da tako nešto odvali....al` sam subjektivan!!!Slušanje jazz-a po kafićima???To mi je baš teško pitanje, ne sećam se da sam u poslednje vreme nešto mnogo čuo jazz po lokalima.
I mi Valjevci, konja za trku imamo!!!Tamo se već 15-ak godina redovno u maju održava Yu Jazz Fest.Umetnički direktor je Valjevac, saksofonista Jovan Maljoković,pa najviše zbog njegove upornosti svake godine se u tri dana spakuju najznačajniji domaći jazz izvođači.Bude nekad baš fino, ranijih godina su više dolazili i stranci, prošle godine publika odlepila za pijanistom iz Hrvatske Matijom Dedićem(Arsenov sin).
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#40 bebel

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Posted 16 December 2003 - 13:25

e brisko to o cemu pricas i o pancevu kakvom pricas postoje danas samo obrisi..kupe s njim ti je prica kao i sa platoom npr.(komercijalizacija koja uzima maha),radio pancevo je izgubilo onu politicku i sarkasticnu ostrinu ali muzika je i dalje solidna,ima par autorskih emisija koji podsecaju na deepilegal ili jam session na skc radiju itd..Ali cinjenica je da nazalost pored toliko cak i patoloske blizine Beograda gubi kulturnu autonomiju ali ne da se...jos je ovde centar alternativnog stripa,muzike..valjda ce biti bolje ..nego ja bih uskoro trebala da dobijem ovu bednu crkavicu called drzavna stipendija pa bih se u uputila u povecu nabavku na berzi ali mi treba neki guru cisto da me uputi kod kojih ljudi..i sta..da li se neko nudi..thanksss.. :lol: :lol: :lol:
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#41 bebel

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Posted 19 December 2003 - 12:13

nesto je crko ovaj topic..ma neka kako kazu jedina sigurna stvar su metar-dva zemlje na nekom groblju pa ajde bar dostojanstveno da ga sahranimo..onako kako smo poceli
da li je izasao novi musica jazz?? u Pancevu ga nema,ako je neko kupio samo utiske u kratko..
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#42 mikkor

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Posted 19 December 2003 - 12:19

nije crko, odlican je. samo da zamolimo nekako moderatora da ga ipak spojimo sa prethodnim JAZZ topicom, mislim da je chandrin. samo napred, puno pozdrava
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#43 bebel

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Posted 19 December 2003 - 12:21

mozeee... :lol: :lol: :lol:
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#44 pal

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Posted 19 December 2003 - 13:47

predizborna koalicija dva topica?

odlicna ideja :lol:
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#45 chandra

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Posted 19 December 2003 - 15:11

Ajde da se i ja pridruzim zahtevu za prisajedinjenjem. Treba da potpisemo neki sporazum?

Vec dva dana do iznemoglosti slusam poslednji album Flore Purim, Speak No Evil. To je njena prva jazz ploca posle vise od 25 godina. Tacnije "jazz" ploca. Tj, bar peva jazz standarde na svoj specifican nacin.

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"Flora is one of those rare talents that truly understand how to phrase lyrics and melody. Simply put, she can swing and she can sing!" - George Duke Flora Purim's voice, as seductive and playful as ever, lends that special Brazilian flair to tunes by Cole Porter, George & Ira Gershwin, Wayne Shorter, and others, backed by a wicked percussion section leady by the legendary Airto Moreira.
~
For those who know jazz and Latin music, Flora Purim needs little introduction. Her astonishing voice has woven itself into the fabric of 3 decades of music and she has become one of its brightest luminaries.
Flora's once-in-a-generation six octave voice has earned her two Grammy nominations for Best Female Jazz Performance and Downbeat magazine's Best Female Singer accolade on four occasions. Her musical partners have included Gil Evans, Stan Getz, Chick Corea, Dizzy Gillespie, and Airto Moreira, with whom she has collaborated on over 30 albums since moving with him from her native Rio to New York in 1967. 
Triumphant and subtle, SPEAK NO EVIL shows one of jazz's leading ladies in full form with an unmistakable vitality on a song list that leans to the winds of traditional jazz, while celebrating her Brazilian roots.
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