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#31 christofer

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Posted 02 July 2017 - 21:31

@doorn ako ti se svidja R&J koja je odlicna po odnosu cena/kvalitet a sledeci put se pocasti i uzmi Vegas Robaina classico...mozes i sa nekim boljim konjakom malo da "umocis" kraj pa se pijucka taman dok se pusi...nije za obicne prilike ali ponekad da se pocastis :). To sam pokupio foru od nekih iskusnijih od mene...bitno je upariti cigaru i pice i to daje poseban smek celom iskustvu. Ne mora konjak, moze i kafa, viski... Sent from my SM-N910C using Tapatalk
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#32 Doorn

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Posted 02 July 2017 - 22:44

@christofer, hvala na preporuci. Stavicu je na listu.

Danas sam uz kafu ispusio RyJ Romeo no.3. Bio sam skeptican nakon dosta negativnih reakcija o Kubancima. Ukus je blag i u momemtima ljut. Ukus nije konstantan kao kod prosle Nikaragvanske cigare koja je meni licno puno bolja od ove. Kod prstena sam prestao jer vise nije licilo na cigaru. Dok sam prosloj prsten skinuo i nastavio. I sama izrada cigare je manje kvalitete nego kod prosle. Na pocetku i kraju cigare se moze opipati da je mekana. Inace ovo je ok cigara za te novce i dobar izbor za ulazak u svijet Kubanskih cigara. 82cc7874a089f6159ce63298c78ba8f0.jpg

Edited by Doorn, 02 July 2017 - 22:45.

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#33 Doorn

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Posted 03 July 2017 - 11:22

 

Cigars are like wine--filled with subtle hints and nuances that you may miss if you’re not paying attention.

 
 
Though it can take years to develop the skills to distinguish all those flavors, you can experience more from your cigars today. Just follow this brief cigar tasting guide.
 
 
 
Taste it before you light it
 
Hold the cigar in your mouth before you fire it up. You’ll be able to experience the sweetness or bitterness of your cigar, indications that it’s a good smoke. However, if you taste acidity or saltiness, this may mean that the cigar was made from less-than-stellar tobacco.
 
 
 
Smoke Slowly
 
Cigars are like most things in life--the slower you go, the more you’ll be able to notice.
 
So puff leisurely. Leave some time in between each draw and let the smoke linger in your mouth for a few seconds. It’s one of the simplest cigar tasting tips, but it makes the aftertaste more prominent and prevents the cigar from overheating.
 
 
 
Use your nose
 
We have more flavor detectors in our nose than on our tongue. So use your nose, or as some call it, ‘retro-hale’.
 
How do you do it? Take a puff, then release roughly half to three quarters of the smoke out of your mouth. Then, push the remaining smoke to the back of your mouth with your tongue and at the same time exhale through your nose.
 
If you’ve never retro-haled, take it easy: start with mild cigars. Otherwise, you may end up coughing a lot.
 
 
Protect your palate
 
Tasting cigar flavors comes easiest when your palate hasn’t been contaminated or overwhelmed. Here are a few ways to ensure that:
 
If you’re smoking a cigar for the first time, just drink water. Drinks will change the flavors you experience.
If you’re smoking multiple cigars, smoke the mildest first. Otherwise, the powerful flavors of the strong cigars may linger and make it hard for you to detect milder flavors.
Sip apple juice between cigars. It may help cleanse your palate.

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#34 Doorn

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Posted 05 July 2017 - 15:09

 

CUTTING YOUR CIGAR
 
New cigar smokers learn early on about the importance of a good cut. An improper cut will ruin the cigar, causing the end to split or the wrapper to unravel. So, especially if you're conscious of how much you're spending on your cigars, you'll want to pay careful attention to cutting them properly.
 
Regardless of the method, the goal in cutting a cigar is to create an ample opening through which to smoke, without damaging the cigar's construction. Too small a cut and the cigar won't draw; too wide a cut and the cigar will fall apart. On most cigars, a good rule of thumb is to make the cut about one-sixteenth of an inch from the cigar's head. But if you don't have a ruler handy, simply look for the cigar's shoulder -- the place where the cap of the cigar straightens out -- and cut the cigar there.
 
The other popular method of cutting is to make a wedge in the shape of a V in the end of a cigar. While this kind of cut makes it easy to draw on the cigar, it can have its drawbacks: sometimes the draw is too easy, making the smoke burn hot. Additionally, this kind of cut may not be for you if you tend to chomp on your cigars -- chewing on a cigar can make the wedge collapse, closing off the draw and making smoking impossible.
 
CUTTING TOOLS
 
There are several styles of cutters on the market today, each designed to provide the smoker with the smoothest cut possible, while minimizing the possibility of damaging the cigar. Most cigar smokers have several cutters, which often can fit easily in a pocket, while some aficionados own larger, sturdier machines that sit atop a desk.
 
Obviously, you already have a cutter on you right now: your teeth. But this method has its drawbacks. First, it's difficult to see exactly where you're biting into the cigar, making it more likely you'll damage it. Second, your teeth aren't nearly as sharp as the blade on a commercial cutter. And third, you're likely to wind up with a wad of wet tobacco in your mouth.
 
Knives, conversely, are very sharp, but cutting a cigar effectively with a knife requires a surgeon's cutting stroke: too slow or too unsteady a cut will certainly destroy your cigar. But if you do choose to cut your cigars this way, make sure not to use any oils when cleaning your knife -- the residues can wind up on the cigar, corrupting its flavor.
 
Piercers, sometimes called lances, also present challenges. Piercing the cigar too deeply can create a tunnel in the center of the cigar, causing it to burn hot. Additionally, the opening created by these cutters has two significant tradeoffs: 1) the cigar may not draw evenly, preventing the smoker from reaping the full flavor of the blend; 2) nicotine and tars build up around the opening of a cigar, so using a piercer will cause a concentration of these chemicals near the smoker's mouth.
 
Guillotine cutters, whether single- or double-bladed, are some of the best options for cutting a cigar. They make an even cut across the cigar's head, providing an ample opening without the drawbacks associated with other cutters.
 
When using a single-bladed guillotine, the cigar should be placed on the far side of the opening, as far from the blade as possible. The blade should then be brought through the cigar swiftly, removing the cap in one fluid stroke. (Picture a real guillotine: if you have to keep cutting over and over again, you'll be left with a hacked-up severed head and an aghast group of onlookers. You may even wind up on the block next, yourself.) Using the cutter in any other manner may cause the cigar to be pinched before it is cut, damaging and often ruining the wrapper.
 
It's also important to ensure that the compartment sheathing the blade is kept free of loose tobacco. These compartments can clog easily, jamming the cutter and compromising its effectiveness.
 
Double-bladed guillotines have an advantage over the single-bladed variety in that the cigar is cut simultaneously on both sides, giving a smooth, clean cut without the risk of pinching the cigar. Again, the best method is to position the cigar close to one of the two blades before cutting.
 
While cigar scissors can provide exceptionally clean cuts and are some of the most elegant cigar tools available, they must be used with caution. Just as each baseball player uses a bat that's weighted to his preference, a cigar scissor must conform to each individual smoker's hand. If the weight of the tool isn't right and the device doesn't feel natural in your hand, you will act like a brain surgeon wearing mittens -- clumsy. Therefore, it is important to test a pair of scissors before you buy them; if the handles and blades don't feel balanced or the scissors feel awkward in your hand, consider another pair. The most beautiful cutting tool in the world is useless if it renders your cigar a pile of shredded tobacco leaves.
 
It's a smart investment for any cigar smoker to own a quality cutter. A bad cut will destroy a cigar, and ruined cigars very quickly add up to the price of even the finest cutter.
 
LIGHTING YOUR CIGAR
 
Believe it or not, this is not as simple as it seems. Lighting cigars is not like lighting a cigarette or candle -- it takes patience to achieve the perfect light. Lighting a cigar can best be likened to roasting marshmallows over a campfire: keep the cigar just above the flame, being careful not to let the two touch. Lighting the cigar directly in the flame will carbonize the tobacco, harming the flavor. Also, as with a marshmallow, it's a good idea to rotate the cigar to ensure that all sides are heated evenly. Most importantly, take your time. Be patient and allow the flame to create a glowing ring around the circumference of the cigar. Once the cigar is lit, gently blow on the embers to create a smooth, rounded ash.
 
Now you're ready to take your first puff. But how do you do it? Many cigar smokers blow the first puff outward through the cigar, to rid the cigar of any sulfuric or gaseous flavors that may have been created by the match or lighter. But never, ever give a cigar more than one outward puff.
 
A WORD ON RELIGHTING
 
Many cigar purists consider it an abomination to ever have to relight a cigar. But when you pay more attention to your conversation than to the cigar you're smoking, the need will sometimes arise. Relighting a cigar is fine if done soon after it goes out, and a warm cigar should be easier to light than a fresh one. Do not, however, relight a cigar the next day, or even several hours after first smoking. This will result in some truly unsavory flavors that will, in all likelihood, make you regret relighting the cigar.
 
If your cigar keeps going out mid-smoke, however, or if you have to relight it repeatedly, you may have a badly rolled cigar. This is an occasional problem, since premium cigars are made entirely by hand, and even the most stringent quality-control efforts cannot prevent a cigar from going out occasionally. If you find yourself with a cigar that was poorly rolled, feel free to return it to the cigar shop where you purchased it. A good tobacconist should happily replace it.
 
CHOOSING YOUR WEAPON
 
Never light a cigar with a flame that's likely to alter its flavor. Using candles, for example, while theatrical, can impart odd flavors from the candle wax onto your cigar (and sometimes turn it into a torch). The fluid from oil-based lighters can also add unwanted tastes, as can the sulfuric heads used on many matches.
 
If it's available, light a strip of cedar, called a spill, and use that in turn to light your cigar. But if cedar spills aren't handy and you must use an oil-based lighter, let the flame burn for a moment before lighting your cigar. With matches, try to use wooden matches with sulfurless heads. But if your only option is a paper match, be prepared to use several of them, and always let the sulfur burn off the match before lighting your cigar. You might also consider using more than one match at a time, to achieve a wider flame.
 
The best way to get the perfect light is to use a lighter designed specifically for cigars, with butane for fuel and a flame (or dual flames) wide enough to easily light a cigar. There are dozens of different cigar lighters on the market, and which one is best for you is, as with cutters, a matter of personal preference. The most important requirement is performance -- a lighter should fit easily in your hand, ignite easily, and work without fail every time.
 

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#35 Doorn

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Posted 07 July 2017 - 19:43

Joya de Nicaragua Clásico was the very first national "Puro" exported from Nicaragua, and the only brand to have ever been officially recognized as the country’s official cigar. It’s currently their best selling blend in the European market.

 

 

b04a4992403475df019a80c39c2d2982.jpg


Edited by Doorn, 08 July 2017 - 17:43.

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#36 Honey Badger

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Posted 07 July 2017 - 20:16

 

 

Uopste me ne cudi da si propusio cigare. Sta ti zena kaze na ove 'tutorials'?

 

:D


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#37 Denis Jasharevic

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Posted 07 July 2017 - 22:28

Uopste me ne cudi da si propusio cigare. Sta ti zena kaze na ove 'tutorials'?

 

:D

 

Lepo se zove ... Delicija .......lepo i objashnjava ....... mozda i ja predjem na cigare ...... mada nisam nikad pomishljao.


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#38 Honey Badger

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Posted 07 July 2017 - 22:36

Lepo se zove ... Delicija .......lepo i objashnjava ....... mozda i ja predjem na cigare ...... mada nisam nikad pomishljao.

 

Strasna je. Treba pogledati jos koji njen video, ima se sta nauciti. ;)


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#39 Kinik

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Posted 07 July 2017 - 22:54

...

 

Ja bih radije ovu 

 

Attached File  Partagas-P2.jpg   27.31KB   5 downloads

 

Jaku, aromaticnu, ljutu!

 

:+1:

 

...


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#40 Doorn

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Posted 07 July 2017 - 23:36

To cu kad porastem 😁
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#41 Kinik

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Posted 07 July 2017 - 23:59

...

 

Zelim ti da porastes brzo!

;)

 

...


Edited by Kinik, 07 July 2017 - 23:59.

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#42 Doorn

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Posted 08 July 2017 - 22:41

...
 
Ja bih radije ovu 
 
Attached File  Partagas-P2.jpg   27.31KB   5 downloads
 
Jaku, aromaticnu, ljutu!
 
:+1:
 
...

Da vidimo sta vixen kaze 😁



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#43 Kinik

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Posted 08 July 2017 - 23:11

...

 

Zao mi je.

 

Izbegavam zhemske i na kuvanju, a tim pre na cigarama.

Tu sam bas neprijatan!

:wicked:

Nista mi ne znaci njihovo pomodno misljenje.

 

edit:

 

Imao sam srece sa Darling # 2 da joj cigare nikada nisu smetale, cak su je prijasteljice pitale - kakav ti je to ostar parfem?

 

I onda ga jedng dana pronadjem

 

Attached File  havana aramis.jpg   31.59KB   5 downloads

 

...


Edited by Kinik, 08 July 2017 - 23:29.

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#44 nijesvejedno

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Posted 10 July 2017 - 10:47

ne gori ravno i pepeo otpada  ;)


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#45 Doorn

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Posted 01 August 2017 - 15:21

 

There is a great mystique surrounding Cuban cigars, mainly because ever since the 1962 embargo, Cuban cigars – in fact, anything made in Cuba – has been illegal in the United States. So it’s only natural to want what we can't have.

 
 Although Cuba has very rich tobacco growing soil, and can produce some excellent cigars, there are often quality control problems, and sometime their cigars are rolled too tightly, or are not properly aged, primarily because there is usually a rush to get this much-in-demand product to market.
 
I reached out to Benji Menendez for his expert advice on the subject of Cuban vs. non-Cuban cigars. Of the six original leading Cuban tobacco companies, Benji is the only living person who was active in Cuba during the heyday of Cuban cigars, and is still working in the industry today.  With a storied career spanning 60 years in the cigar premium cigar category, his expertise is unmatched.
 
So here’s what he had to say about Cuba: Until 1960, Cuba had a monopoly on premium cigar tobacco because no one else in the world was growing it. It was only after 1960, when many Cuban people, including some of the country’s most respected tobacco growers and cigar masters, left Cuba that premium tobacco was cultivated in other countries such as the Dominican Republic, Honduras and Nicaragua. As a result, premium cigar tobacco will always be compared to Cuba simply because Cuba was the first place where it was cultivated.
 
Benji also points out that the tobacco’s flavor is derived from the soil and the climate of a particular location before it is harvested. Some Caribbean and Central American countries have soils very similar to Cuba’s, and although not exactly the same, they can produce tobaccos that are equally rich in flavor, strength and depth. But to be clear, because the soil imparts the flavor, nothing tastes like a Cuban cigar other than a Cuban cigar, just as nothing tastes like a Nicaraguan cigar except a Nicaraguan cigar.
 
A good comparison between Cuban and non-Cuban cigars is to liken them to French and California wines. Each is different. But is one better than another? That is a matter of opinion, taste, and perception of value.

Edited by Doorn, 01 August 2017 - 15:23.

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