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Album of the Day


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#1 melankolic

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Posted 23 August 2012 - 08:59

Darling Farah

Body



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Minimal techno with IDM and bass music overtones on the first full-length for Civil Music from Detroit-born, London based producer Kamau Baaqi


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#2 melankolic

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Posted 24 August 2012 - 17:02

Divine Fits

A Thing Called Divine Fits


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August 12, 2012
The word "supergroup" gets thrown around like so much confetti, then affixed to any band whose members have worked on high-profile projects of any kind in the past. But not all supergroups are the bloated product of committee thinking or Frankensteinian ego exercises; some are just established musicians who've discovered organically that they like working with certain other established musicians.
Divine Fits will surely get tagged as a supergroup, though its members — Spoon's Britt Daniel, Dan Boeckner of Wolf Parade and Handsome Furs, and New Bomb Turks' Sam Brown, with Alex Fischel helping out on keyboards — aren't exactly Mick Jagger teaming up with Dave Stewart in the fame department. Their projects are known and respected, absolutely, but even Daniel is hailed as much for his fussed-over pop-rock craftsmanship as he is for his stage persona.
Aside from a teaser single, A Thing Called Divine Fits is the first most will have heard of their work together, and if they took a while to hone their collective sound, it doesn't show here. This is the work of guys who know exactly what they want from their music: namely, to explore a bit of a new-wave streak while still operating in their wheelhouse of slick, sharp, smart pop-rock.
Fischel's synths really help flesh out these 11 songs — the hook in "My Love Is Real" could have propelled an alternate-universe hit for The Human League — but a spikier, guitar-driven side still wins the day in "Flaggin a Ride," while "Baby Get Worse" splits the difference with winning results. Divvying their vocal duties roughly 50/50, Daniel and Boeckner keep A Thing Called Divine Fits sounding crisp and quotable, as in "My Love Is Real" ("My love is real / until it stops") and "Shivers" ("I've been contemplating suicide / but it really doesn't suit my style"), among others. Comparisons are fair and inevitable, but the album deserves that highest of compliments: For all its familiar components, it sounds like Divine Fits.

npr.org


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#3 melankolic

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Posted 29 August 2012 - 20:33

Turbonegro

- Sexual Harrasment


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Losing a lead singer is a little like losing a head in the ‘future prognosis’ stakes. Sure, the band might continue to play on, just as a decapitated chicken can continue to strut out a lap of the farmyard, but really, once that severing has occurred, the writing is well and truly on the wall. Accordingly, the departure of vocalist Hank von Helvete should really have been the final bell for denim-clad Norwegian “death punks” Turbonegro. But with gruff new British singer Tony Sylvester – formerly of London bruisers The Dukes Of Nothing – at the helm, they sound on this new album like a band reinvigorated (especially after 2007’s rather limp ‘Retox’). Turbo’s charm is in the way they don’t just understand, but completely inhabit the essential ridiculousness of rock’n’roll, the likes of ‘I Got A Knife’, ‘Tight Jeans, Loose Leash’ and stomping piano-pounder ‘Shake Your Shit Machine’ a sour cocktail of glam, Ramones, Stones and black metal that backs up that tongue you can hear in its cheek with the bulge of a nice firm bicep.

-NME

Razvaljivanje.
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#4 melankolic

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Posted 30 August 2012 - 23:41

The Men - 'Open Your Heart'


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Us British folks have only just been given a shoeing from ‘Leave Home’, the second album from NYC hardcore-not-hardcore hellions The Men, and along comes a follow-up. Overall, ‘Open Your Heart’ is breezier and more tuneful than its predecessor, but this is very relative.

There are still buzzing hairballs of psychedelic punk, vocals fighting for priority in the gnarly mix, a Sonic Youth-ish nose for detuned exhilaration in cuts like ‘Oscillation’ and ‘Cube’. Factor in the title track (aka the cheekiest Buzzcocks homage you ever heard) and understand that these cats are riding the DIY-punk-to-lamestream-tonguebath train for very good reasons.

Noel Gardner


Sjajan album.
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#5 melankolic

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Posted 03 September 2012 - 12:46


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#6 melankolic

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Posted 05 September 2012 - 21:13

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BBC Review


Can do: quintessential krautrock rescued from the archives.
Wyndham Wallace 2012-06-11

Three CDs of rehearsal tapes, live recordings, studio jams and forgotten soundtracks might, in the case of most bands, seem like an overwhelming, most likely futile, indulgence. But Can – whose influence, like The Velvet Underground’s, grows with each year – are different. The German band’s entire methodology, beginning with their 1969 debut, Monster Movie, was to leave the studio tape running, editing down whatever emerged from their lengthy improvisations to create some of the most kosmische music of what became known as krautrock. The Lost Tapes, drawn from over 50 hours of recordings covering their entire career, collates the best of what was left behind.
At their best, Can could be transcendental, Irmin Schmidt (keyboards), Jaki Liebezeit (drums), Michael Karoli (guitars) and Holger Czukay (bass) pooling their musical talents on furiously rhythmic freakouts, atmospheric soundscapes and playfully extravagant sonic experiments. With Malcom Mooney on vocals, replaced later by Damo Suzuki, they also had vocalists wholly in synch with their aesthetic: sometimes calm, sometimes frankly berserk. Given their intuitive playing and commitment to experimentation, it’s little wonder Can continue to inspire so many.
For fans of Mooney, The Lost Tapes are an especially welcome treasure trove, offering seven previously unheard tracks, including the deranged Deadly Doris and the 10-minute Waiting for the Streetcar, a classic example of Can’s winning ability to stretch one idea beyond breaking point and still emerge inspired. But there’s more to this collection than just material for completists: though some may struggle to find any purpose in The Agreement’s apparent recording of a toilet, and may wonder if monkeys were let loose in the studio for Blind Mirror Surf, the 16-plus minutes of Graublau – a 1969 soundtrack – are dizzily energetic and excitingly innovative, as good as anything they recorded.
Bubble Rap is another gem, boasting a lazy, low-slung groove before building to a fierce psychedelic climax, and even Barnacles, recorded late in their career, has a pleasant funk within. With staggering live versions of Spoon and Mushroom to boot, The Lost Tapes turns out to be even rarer than its contents: a collection almost as vital as Can’s official album output.


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#7 melankolic

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Posted 10 September 2012 - 00:43

Sjajan album!

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By Will Hermes
August 30, 2012

Bob Dylan's 35th album begins with a train whistle exploding in his mind. He sees an old oak tree he used to climb and imagines a woman smiling through a fence. He hears the voice of "the mother of our Lord" – and still, that whistle, screaming "like the sky's gonna blow apart." It's astonishing, " Duquesne Whistle" suggests, how much can be channeled through a simple sound.
That notion defines Dylan's career, and especially his output of the past decade – music built from traditional forms and drawing on eternal themes: love, struggle, death. With its jazzy, pre-rock groove, "Duquesne Whistle" could be from any of Dylan's last three albums, 2001's Love and Theft, 2006's Modern Times or 2009's Together Through Life. But then the song ends, Dylan gets off the train and soon one of his weirdest albums ever truly starts. Tempest is musically varied and full of curveballs. It may also be the single darkest record in Dylan's catalog.
The body count alone distinguishes it, with songs about the Titanic disaster ("Tempest"), a three-way murder-suicide ("Tin Angel") and the assassination of his old acquaintance John Lennon ("Roll On, John"). "Pay in Blood" is a portrait of raging evil delivered in snarling vocals – Dylan is so close-miked you can practically hear the phlegm rattle. "Early Roman Kings," with David Hidalgo's cantina-blues accordion, conjures "lecherous and treacherous" despots "in their sharkskin suits."
Lyrically, Dylan is at the top of his game, joking around, dropping wordplay and allegories that evade pat readings and quoting other folks' words like a freestyle rapper on fire. "Narrow Way" is one of Dylan's most potent rockers in years, and it borrows a chorus from the Mississippi Sheiks' 1934 blues "You'll Work Down to Me Someday." "Scarlet Town" draws on verses by 19th-century Quaker poet and abolitionist John Greenleaf Whittier; and allusions to Louis Armstrong and the Isley Brothers pop up elsewhere.
The two most powerful cuts here are rooted in fact. At nearly 14 minutes, "Tempest" is epic – 45 verses (with no chorus) about the sinking of the Titanic, set to an Irish melody with accordion and fiddle. Historical accuracy is beyond the point; the reference to Leonardo DiCaprio feels truer to folk tradition than his absence would be. Meanwhile, the scenes are horrifying: passengers plunging into icy waters; "Dead bodies already floating/In the double-bottomed hull"; some men turning murderous; another offering his lifeboat seat to a crippled child. The metaphor is inescapable: a seemingly unsinkable behemoth going down amid small acts of bravery that change little, rich and poor doomed equally.
"Roll On, John," the closing song, was written for a man who wrestled with the oppressiveness of fame and deification as much as Dylan has. "I heard the news today, oh, boy," he sings, referencing Lennon's murder and a Beatles lyric in a voice that throbs with survivor's guilt. It's a prayer from one great artist to another, and a reminder that Dylan now stands virtually alone among his 1960s peers. His own final act, meanwhile, rolls on. It's a thing to behold.


@Rolling Stone


http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=aZRvlitbabk

Edited by melankolic, 10 September 2012 - 00:50.

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#8 melankolic

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Posted 17 September 2012 - 08:45

Grizzly Bear

Shields

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The Guardian review.

Fino, fino.
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#9 melankolic

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Posted 09 October 2012 - 12:43

Darkwood Dub- Vidimo se

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#10 melankolic

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 11:52

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Second outing for Thom Yorke's non-Radiohead electronic project, alongside Nigel Godrich, Joey Waronker, Mauro Refosco and Flea

 


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#11 Rale84

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 13:34

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Edited by Streetcrawler, 19 February 2013 - 13:34.

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#12 Rale84

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Posted 06 March 2013 - 18:38

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#13 barracuda

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Posted 06 March 2013 - 18:53

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Underworld - Dub No Bass With My Head Man

 

 


Edited by barracuda, 06 March 2013 - 18:53.

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#14 melankolic

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Posted 06 March 2013 - 23:30

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http://youtu.be/6UFzde_Y_t0


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#15 melankolic

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 14:01

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xIxZZdYPh3Q&feature=share&list=PLnua22HvrABPreDz7oI2ZglOGO__PSuzh


Edited by melankolic, 08 March 2013 - 14:02.

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