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#616 /13/Ален Шмит/

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Posted 16 July 2017 - 23:48

Na današnji dan 1995. napustio nas je Huan Manuel Fanđo i 2015. Žil Bjanki.


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#617 Rad-oh-yeah?

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Posted 18 July 2017 - 18:06

82LM43.JPG

The 935's Frankenstein era
Thursday, 13 July 2017
RACER Staff / Image by LAT


Malleability isn't usually a benchmark by which race cars are measured. But if they were, the Porsche 935 would be right up there.

The Group 5 rulebook for which it was designed in the mid-1970s was already a fairly accommodating one in terms of the options available to make modifications, and Porsche continued to evolve the car through several iterations in the years that followed, including the famously long-tailed, low-slung 935/78 "Moby Dick".

Porsche stopped building 935s in 1979 – but that's when things got really interesting. The vacuum created by the factory's withdrawal was filled by a cottage industry for modding, led by the likes of Kremer in Europe and U.S. firm FABCAR.

You could do what John Paul's JLP team did and have a 935 special (dubbed JLP-3) built from a donor 1972 911T, and then use it to win both the 24 Hours of Daytona and 12 Hours of Sebring in 1982. Or, you could put a Lola T600 GTP nose on it and take it to Le Mans. That was Bob Akin's route.

His 935 L1 – designed, like the JLP-3, by GAACO – made its debut at Lime Rock in May, 1982 before being shipped off to France where its straightline speed was immediately apparent along the Mulsanne. Other parts of the car were less robust however, and Akin, along with co-drivers David Cowart and Kemper Miller, were out of the race after just two hours due to a problem with the reserve gas tank.

It returned to the U.S. to complete the remainder of the 1982 IMSA season, earning a best result of fourth at Road Atlanta in the hands of Akin and Hurley Haywood, before being parked for good after crashing out of the Camel GT 500 Grand Prix at Pocono. (John Paul and John Paul Jr took their JLP-3 to second on that day, albeit a lap down on the Lola T600 shared by Danny Ongais and Ted Field).

After returning to Akin's workshop though, the 935 L1 remained under a sheet for nearly two decades before being purchased and fully restored in 1999. It's now an alpha predator in vintage racing – and if you have deep enough pockets, it happens to be for sale through Canepa.
 
And Akin? His association with 935s didn't end there. Two years later, had had FABCAR build the iconic Cola Cola 935-84 – at the time, the fastest 935 ever.


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#618 Rad-oh-yeah?

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Posted 20 July 2017 - 18:42

http://www.f1fanatic...rgs-record-lap/


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#619 Rad-oh-yeah?

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Posted 24 July 2017 - 02:12

Dobar dokumentarac:

 


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#620 Rad-oh-yeah?

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Posted 25 July 2017 - 15:17

http://www.f1fanatic...ed-team-orders/

 

 

The drivers who defied team orders

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#621 Rad-oh-yeah?

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Posted 25 July 2017 - 18:57


 

The 1973 French Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at the Paul Ricard Circuit on July 1, 1973. It was the eighth race of the 1973 World Championship of Drivers and the 1973 International Cup for F1 Manufacturers.

This race was notable for a collision involving Jody Scheckter and Emerson Fittipaldi. Scheckter, who was given an opportunity to drive a factory McLaren for this event was leading from the start in just his third Formula One race. On lap 41, Fittipaldi had closed and attempted to pass the South African, but Scheckter closed the door and they made heavy contact, forcing Emerson into retirement. Scheckter continued but spun out shortly after. Fittipaldi ran to the McLaren pits, eventually resulting in fierce words between the two drivers. Scheckter claimed years later that Fittipaldi had called him a 'young hooligan' for his role in the incident. Many drivers wanted him banned from the sport, but McLaren instead decided to put him on the sidelines for a number of races.

Meanwhile, after so many promising races turned to nothing, Swedish driver Ronnie Peterson finally celebrated victory for the first time in his career, driving a Lotus. Tyrrell driver François Cevert finished in second place, whilst Carlos Reutemann finished in third place, driving a Brabham.


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#622 Rad-oh-yeah?

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Posted 28 July 2017 - 18:39


 

Bobby Rahal wins his second race of the 1987 season, leaving pit lane ahead of Michael Andretti after Andretti's team has issues changing the left rear tire. Mario Andretti would valiantly attempt to chase down Rahal during the final stages, but would come up short.

Rahal, the 1986 Indy car champion, would take over the 1987 CART PGG Indy Car Championship points standings over Michael Andretti by four points, 74-70.

 

No ovoj stazi je inace bilo planirano i da se vozi F1 za VN Njujorka, u jednoj od silinh inkarnacija pokusaja da se takva trka organizuje. Kao sto znamo, svi ti pokusaji su se izjalovili.


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#623 Rad-oh-yeah?

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Posted 02 August 2017 - 02:58

Pat Santello 1926-2017
Tuesday, 01 August 2017
By Robin Miller / Image by IMS Photo

Santello2.jpg
Above: Pat Santello (left), and Lee Kunzman in 1977.


He was one of the last to tow his Indy car on an open-wheel trailer. He spent his own money to go racing and loved the dirt as much as he did the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. He sponsored Gary Bettenhausen's sprinter, ran up front with George Snider in dirt cars, finished seventh at Indy with Lee Kunzman and gave Larry Rice and Tim Richmond their start in IndyCar.

Pat Santello, who died last week at age 91, embodied all that was good about USAC racing in the 1960s and 1970s.

"He was a great guy and a character that represented the good old days of backyard racing," said Kunzman, who drove Santello's Indy car in 1976 and 1977. "He never had much of a budget but nobody had more spirit and heart."

A native of Syracuse, New York, Santello showed up in the late '60s when USAC sprint-car racing was afire with the Larry and Gary Show. Larry Dickson and Gary Bettenhausen waged a personal duel for the title from 1968-71; Pat sponsored Willie Davis' car with Bettenhausen and it displayed the "City of Syracuse" special when he claimed the championship in 1969.

Snider ran second twice in the "City of Syracuse" champ dirt car at Springfield (1969), Illinois and Sacramento (1970) before USAC moved the dirt tracks out of the Championship Trail.

Santello's initial try at Indianapolis in 1976 with a six-year-old Eagle didn't work, but the next May the original "little guy" watched his car successfully qualify.

1977-Lee-Kunzman-Qual-with-Crew-Car-65.j

"I think we only had $20,000 so Dan [Gurney] was kind enough to give us a deal on a three-year-old Eagle so I rented a truck, loaded it up with the car and some spare parts and drove it back to Indianapolis," recalled Kunzman, one of USAC's finest racers who twice battled back from devastating injuries to keep racing.

"I think we kept it at Howard Millican's shop. Mark Stainbrook was the chief mechanic [and only full-time employee] and we went around Gasoline Alley begging for old Offy parts to put an engine together and Willie [Davis] built it."

Kunzman qualified 24th and ran all day to finish seventh. "The car handled great and I ran flat out almost the whole day because it wasn't real fast in a straight line," he said with a laugh. "But it made Pat so happy that his little team had done so well in the biggest race in the world."

Santello bought a Lightning chassis for Rice at Indy in 1977 with the help of pal Bernie Gerthoffer, and the USAC champ finished 11th to capture co-rookie-of-the-year honors with Rick Mears. They also made the show again in 1979 and Richmond took over that car at Watkins Glen in '79 and ran eighth in his IndyCar debut.

In the USAC/CART split, Santello sided with CART for a little while until he got tired of the politics. When the big money began coming in, he was out.

"Nobody loved racing more than Pat," Kunzman said. "And I think the day we ran seventh at Indy was his proudest moment so I was happy to be part of it."


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#624 Rad-oh-yeah?

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Posted 04 August 2017 - 15:29

Na danasnji dan, pre 49 godina:

 

https://en.wikipedia...rman_Grand_Prix

 

 

Jedna od najneverovatnijih voznji u istoriji F1, i pobeda Dzekija Stjuarta sa razlikom od preko 4 minuta ispred drugoplasiranog Hila.


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#625 alberto.ascari

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Posted 13 August 2017 - 09:47

20768102_1773455186001033_16564565756695


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#626 Downforce

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Posted 14 August 2017 - 15:53

https://www.youtube....6M#t=419.630222

 

A dosao je na preporuku James Hunt-a...kojeg je pobedio u trci...

 

Gladijatori. Ljudine.


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#627 Rad-oh-yeah?

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Posted 14 August 2017 - 16:40

 

Classic Rewind's look at the 1987 Indy car season continues with Round 7 of the CART PPG IndyCar World Series - the Budweiser Grand Prix of Cleveland from Burke Lakefront Airport. Bobby Rahal entered the event looking for his third-straight win, but found himself locked in a duel with Emerson Fittipaldi. The pair made their final pit stops with 23 laps remaining and both tried to stretch their tanks to the end.

 


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#628 Rad-oh-yeah?

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Posted 18 August 2017 - 01:47

 

Druga Indikar trka u Torontu 1987, zanimljivo je videti koliko se staza i njena okolina u medjuvremenu drasticno promenila. Bobi Rehol pobednik prve trke 1986. startuje sa pol pozicije ali trka ostaje upamcena po ludackom finisu sa Fitipaldijem i Salivenom u glavnim ulogama. Klasik u pravom smislu the reci!


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#629 Rad-oh-yeah?

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Posted 18 August 2017 - 15:02

Roy Lunn, 'Godfather of the Ford GT40,' dies at 92
Thursday, 17 August 2017
By RACER Staff / Images courtesy Ford Performance

roy_lunn.jpg


Roy Lunn, the "Godfather of the Ford GT40," died on August 5 at the age of 92.

"All of us at Ford are saddened to hear of the passing of Roy Lunn," said Raj Nair, executive vice president and president of North America, Ford Motor Company. "His legacy as the godfather of the original Ford GT40 was well known throughout the company, and he helped bring Ford a performance car that is just as legendary today as it was in the 1960s. The team that put together the Ford GT of today was inspired by the work of Roy and his team and we will be forever grateful for the work they started. We like to think that his GT40, and our GT of today, are both cars that showcased the best of what Ford Motor Company can do."

Born in Richmond, England in 1925, Lunn earned degrees in mechanical and aeronautical egineering at Kingston Technical College and was a pilot in the Royal Air Force. When World War II ended, he transferred to the Royal Aircraft Establishment in Farnborough and worked on the design and development of gas turbine generators for the first Turbo-Jet aircraft.

He started his automotive career at AC CARS as an engineer in 1946 and, in the late 1940s, became the assistant chief designer (1947-49) at Aston Martin and built two DB2s that competed at Le Mans. After three years as chief designer and engineer at Jowett Cars, he joined Ford of England in 1953 as an engineer and product-planning manager.

lunn_lede.jpg

In 1958, Lunn moved to the U.S. and Ford Central Advanced Engineering. Between 1958-69, some of the projects he was responsible for included the Mustang I, Big Red, the Superhighway truck, Flying Car Concept, the mid-engineered Mustang and all the GT40 variants. He left Ford in 1969 to become vice president of engineering at Kar-Kraft, where he oversaw production of the Boss 429 Mustang and development of Mustang concepts with mid-mounted 429 engines. In 1971 Roy was recruited by American Motors Corporation (AMC) to become the technical director of engineering for Jeep.

Among Lunn's credits are the 1983 Jeep Cherokee XJ, the first American-branded vehicle to be manufactured in China, and the AMC Eagle, the first production four-wheel-drive car. He also developed the first SCCA Spec-racing car in 1983, the SCCA Sports Renault.

Lunn served as chairman of the technical board of the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) in 1982-83 and elected a Fellow of the Society in 1983. After retiring from AMC in 1985 he joined AM General as vice president of engineering to head the Humvee military compliance program for the Pentagon.

He is survived by his wife of 70 years, Jeanie, and two daughters, two granddaughters, a son-in-law and one great-grandson.


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#630 Rad-oh-yeah?

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Posted 18 August 2017 - 15:48

Juce mu je bio 65. rodjendan:

 

Nelson_Piquet_Souto_Maior.jpg

 

06e3e7dce7d330dc15a5cba1b32896c9.jpg


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